Tonight at 7:45 you will be able to observe the Penumbral Lunar Eclipse otherwise known as “The Strawberry Moon Eclipse” for a full 3 hours and 18 minutes.

Eclipses do not happen by chance and neither do they happen alone; a solar eclipse—which can only happen at New Moon when the Moon is between the Earth and Sun—is always accompanied by a lunar eclipse at the Full Moon either two weeks before or two weeks after. Sometimes both. Sometimes there are two solar eclipses in a row separated by a lunar eclipse.

lunar eclipse

The three eclipses—one solar and two lunar—eclipses in the “eclipse season” that begins today.

We will hopefully all be able to see the Lunar Eclipse from South Africa but if for some reason you can see it you can still check out the eclipse for yourself and can still keep tabs on the moon digitally, thanks to a livestream from the Virtual Telescope Project.

 

source: space.com